Save Money with Meatless Monday Dinners

 

Many people are unaware that eating healthy can actually be easier and more affordable than grabbing fast food.  Having healthy family dinners often requires a little bit of planning.  Plus, you do not have to be a great chef to prepare tasty meatless meals.  Use meatless chicken and meatless beef products to make Monday night dinner easy.  The right meatless Monday recipes can help save time and money.  Many people are not excited about making Monday night meals.  However, you and your family might find that meatless Mondays are the best dinners of the week. 

How You Can Save both Time and Money by Cooking Vegetarian Meals

The average fast food meal for a family of four is not as cheap as many people think it is.  Four meals at a fast food restaurant typically cost anywhere from $20-$28.  However, a homemade vegetable soup for four people can cost under $5.  Add some meatless chicken for additional protein, and make simple dumplings to serve a more balanced meal.  Soup is a classic winter family dinner.  The leftovers can easily be frozen and reheated for weekend lunches and snacks.  One of the best parts of a humble vegetable soup is that you do not have to be a stellar chef with ample time to cook.  Below is one of the top meatless Monday recipes, meatless chicken and dumpling soup.

meatless monday

image courtesy of thefoodyenta.com

Meatless Chicken and Dumpling Soup

Ingredients:

1 bag of meatless chicken

1 large yellow onion

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 cloves garlic

1 bunch of parsley

1 large turnip

2 russet potatoes

3 carrots

3 celery sticks

1 bay leaf

Salt and pepper to taste

Water

For the dumplings:

1 cup flour

1 tablespoon baking power

1 teaspoon salt

¼ cup milk (or soy milk; soy milk will result in more hearty dumplings)

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Ginataang Langka with Shrimps

Langka or jackfruit is an aromatic native fruit found in the tropical regions in the Southeast Asia. The flesh of a ripe jackfruit is sweet, fibrous and starchy whereas it can be eaten raw or can be used to make a variety of dishes such as minatamis na langka (sweetened ripe jackfruit), cakes and custards, halo-halo and more. The seeds are edible too; you can just simply boil the seeds and eat it when it cooled down. The boiled seeds taste good and I refer it as the local counterpart of Castañas.

 

The young unripe jackfruit can be cooked in coconut milk which can be flavored in different ways according to your preference. You can add salted dried fish or daing, pork, crab or shrimps to add a delectable taste to this dish. This recipe is most often served in Filipino households.

 

Below is my own recipe of Ginataang Langka with Shrimps

 ginataang langka with shrimps

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Cooking your way to warmth: Sausage Potato Corn Chowder

 

This is a guest post by Cassie Corbett.

 

As the weather gets brisk, my house tends to get warmer. This isn’t just because of our heater, though I could probably be accused of overtaxing the poor thing. I tend to cook and bake a lot more in the fall and winter. Whether it’s subconsciously wanting the oven on to spread heat through the house, or the fact that cooking gives me that warm feeling inside, I don’t know, but I do so enjoy staving off the cold with some good food.

I love soup, but my favorite ones are pretty heavy, so I don’t eat them much when the weather is warm. So now I’m celebrating the fall winds by sharing my favorite chowder, my sausage potato soup.

This recipe started as something I found online, and then revised until it was practically unrecognizable. It’s gone unchanged for the past few years, so I think I’ve got it down to the perfect combination of ingredients. You don’t need any fancy tools for this recipe, but I do find that some nice kitchen cookware such as a good stock pot and a food processor do help in making consistent recipes every time, and making the cooking process easier.

Sausage Potato Corn Chowder

Photo credits: southernfood.about.com

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Lechon Macau Recipe

 

There are various Filipino dishes which had been influenced by the Chinese cuisine and one of them is Lechon Macau.  Lechon Macau is oven-baked pork belly, an alternative to the classic all time favorite lechon or whole roasted pig in most occasions. Because it is oven-roasted it has a moist meat and crunchy skin.

 lechon macau

 

If you wonder why this dish is so crispy, the key is to prick the skin with fork before oven baking. One more thing, the combination of the Chinese five spice powder, pepper and salt rubbed on the pork gives its rich and palatable flavor.

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Delectable Stone Crab Claws with Mustard Dip

Stone crab claws are greatly desired delicacy typically served chilled or hot in various ways with different sauces according to one’s preference.  The meat is so sweet that can be eaten as is but I prefer to eat it with a mustard sauce for an enhancing claw dining experience.

Fresh Florida Stone Crab

Photo credits: larryjh1234 – flickr.com

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Steamed Fish Fillet with Garlic

One of the quick and easy to cook recipes I learned from my mom is the steamed fish fillet with garlic. To ensure its delectable taste it is recommended to use fresh fish instead of frozen fillets that can be bought from supermarkets.

 

Steamed fish is a dish very common in most Chinese restaurants and has been considered as one of their house specialties. At first, I was so hesitant to try cooking it for I was not so sure if it will taste the same with what we usually eat in the restaurants. After several tries, I was able to cook it perfectly. The trick is to adjust the amount of the key ingredients like the rice wine and soy sauce to taste according to your preference.

 steamed fish fillet

 

Ingredients:

 

½ kilo of fish fillets (Cream Dory or Red Snapper)

2 tbsp Chinese rice wine (add more according to your preference)

1 tbsp light soy sauce

1 tbsp cooking oil or sesame oil

2 to 3 inches ginger, peeled, cut into thin strips

1 stalk spring onion (scallion, green onion) cut into thin silken threads

Pepper, powdered

Salt (optional)

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